To Your Good Health

By: Dr. Keith Roach

To Your Good Health

Dr. Roach answers reader questions on disease, public health and sports medicine. 5TW

An informative and educational column on infectious diseases, public health and sports medicine by Dr. Keith Roach, a highly respected physician at Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian Hospital.

[dr-keith-roach-with-bkg6-307x360] Dr. Keith Roach graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, with a degree in molecular biology. He earned his M.D. at the University of Chicago, and did his internship and medicine residency training there.

In 2000, Dr. Roach moved to New York, joining the faculty at Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian Hospital as an Associate Attending Physician and Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. He has won every major teaching award offered by that institution. He also served as program director for the primary care internal medicine training program.

The focus of his research is in the prevention of disease with rational use of screening technology and with tools that empower people to make lifestyle choices that improve not only their health but their life expectancy. Dr. Roach also serves as Chief Medical Officer for Enforcer eCoaching, a company dedicated to giving individuals specific daily coaching on improving diet, smoking cessation, weight loss and exercise.

Dr. Roach lives in Larchmont, N.Y. with his wife, Dr. Victoria Muggia, M.D. (a specialist in infectious disease), and their three teenagers, David, Hannah and Jonathan. Dr. Roach is a competitive triathlete.

The email address [email protected] is available directly for readers to leave feedback or ask questions of Dr. Roach.

Push endoscopy allows docs to take a closer look at abnormalities

January 23, 2018 - 9:22am

    DEAR DR. ROACH: I am having a "push endoscope," or forced endoscope, tomorrow. They said they found a lesion in a CT scan and want to look into it further. Is "lesion" a fancy name for cancer? -- B.E.
       ANSWER: The word "lesion" is a Latin word for "injury." In medical parlance, it means pretty much anything that is abnormal. While it is true that doctors will use the term "lesion" to describe something that will later turn out to be cancer, "lesions" definitely are not always cancer.

Estrogen no longer recommended for brain benefits during menopause

January 18, 2018 - 9:58am

       DEAR DR. ROACH: My 78-year-old mother has taken compounded estrogen since menopause. She swears that it has kept her from getting Alzheimer's disease and other brain diseases.
       I am 54 and have been in menopause for about a year. I've tried hormone replacement therapy, but I've had weight gain and other side effects. Eventually I decided that the hot flashes weren't so bad after all, and went off the pills altogether.
       So far, I'm managing my symptoms just fine. But my mom thinks I should go back on the estrogen because of the long-term brain benefits.

General guidelines for living with one kidney

January 17, 2018 - 9:03am

       DEAR DR. ROACH: I had a kidney removed eight months ago due to a kidney tumor, and since then have had bloodwork done numerous times. My GFR fluctuates from 38-44, and my creatinine and BUN levels are high (creatinine level is about 1.7 and BUN around 27; before surgery, my creatinine was 1.2). As of this date, there is no cancer, as I have had several CT scans WITHOUT contrast. They have not shown any sign of metastasis. I have had both bloodwork and urinalysis, and the BUN and creatinine levels have stayed pretty much the same. Is my GFR low because I have only one kidney?

Push endoscopy allows docs to take a closer look at abnormalities

January 16, 2018 - 10:43am

  DEAR DR. ROACH: I am having a "push endoscope," or forced endoscope, tomorrow. They said they found a lesion in a CT scan and want to look into it further. Is "lesion" a fancy name for cancer? -- B.E.
       ANSWER: The word "lesion" is a Latin word for "injury." In medical parlance, it means pretty much anything that is abnormal. While it is true that doctors will use the term "lesion" to describe something that will later turn out to be cancer, "lesions" definitely are not always cancer.

Buick-size prostate has reader seeking sleep remedy

January 12, 2018 - 9:12am

DEAR DR. ROACH: I'm a 75-year-old male with a prostate the size of a Buick. I have to get up four to five times a night to urinate.  After about the third time, I cannot get back to sleep.  I can get about five hours before the problem occurs. My doctor prescribed 10 mg Ambien, and if I take half of the pill, I can get another two hours.  My family history is one of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.  My wife tells me that if I continue to take sleeping pills, I will develop Alzheimer's too. My question: Do I take the pill to get more sleep, or be tired all day with five hours? -- E.H.

Adult pertussis lacks the characteristic whoop in the cough

January 11, 2018 - 9:05am

       DEAR DR. ROACH: I have an adult son with serious medical issues. Because of a persistent cough, he saw his internist four times, as well as a pulmonologist. Blood tests and X-rays were negative. His diagnoses over time included: a bad cold, allergies and sleep apnea. During those months, he was prescribed several antibiotics and steroids, as well as other medications.

How much water is too much?

January 10, 2018 - 9:03am

     DEAR DR. ROACH: I am a rather healthy 35-year-old female. I drink a lot of water daily -- approximately 5-6 liters, just because I feel the need to. My doctor does not seem concerned, as she says it may be normal for my body. I've been drinking these amounts for five to six years (I think it started during pregnancy). My family is concerned, as they say it is too much for the kidneys. I would truly appreciate your opinion.

PAC without symptoms needn't raise an alarm

January 8, 2018 - 2:40pm

       DEAR DR. ROACH: I am a 72-year-old man in excellent health and physical condition. I ride a bicycle 60 miles a week, and I generally feel good. I have an irregular heartbeat in the form of a premature atrial contraction, which showed up years ago for the first time on a routine EKG. I have had this for many years, and I do not have any effects from it that I am consciously aware of. My family doctor is concerned and wants further tests. A cardiologist told me not to worry about it unless I start to have symptoms like chest pain or dizziness.

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