Vitamin D: The Skin Connection

October 5, 2017 - 8:55am

This is the right time of year to start taking Vitamin D – not just for health but for beauty reasons as well.

When it’s hot outside and the days are long, we might not need a vitamin D supplement. Once it gets colder, we cover up more. The days get shorter. We spend less time outside in the sun and there’s less sun to spend our time in.  This is the right time to dust off that bottle of vitamin D and start taking it again.

Vitamin D does so much for us.  Did you know that it helps to reduce falls in seniors?  Apparently, when seniors have adequate levels of vitamin D, they sway less when they walk.  They slip and fall less with reduced swaying.

Vitamin D reduces upper respiratory infections.  Nothing says fall like colds and flus.  You can reduce your risk with vitamin D.

Fondly known as ‘the sunshine vitamin’, D is proven to reduce seasonal affective disorder.  If your mood droops in the fall, taking some D may help.

Here’s your skin connection:  Studies have also shown that vitamin D can reduce acne by 35% after supplementing with it for two months.  Vitamin D can balance oil production in oily skin.  As a matter of fact, skin that seems to be way to oily may be a sign of low levels of vitamin D.

Look for D3.  That’s the good stuff.  Don’t take too much.  Some people take crazy amounts thinking that more must be better.  Too much is as big of a problem as too little.

Here’s to improved mood, fewer falls and slips, fewer cold and flus and clearer skin.

Cherise owns Results in Prince Albert where she is the Goddess of technology skincare.  Learn more at www.resultspa.ca or get in touch with Cherise at 306 953 1986.

 

 

 

 

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