Bequest the largest contribution in history of Historical Society

By Teena Monteleone
May 17, 2017 - 2:00pm
Executor Rick Wilson presented a $145,000 donation from the estate of Lenore Andrews to Connie Gerwing, President of the Historical Society.
Executor Rick Wilson presented a $145,000 donation from the estate of Lenore Andrews to Connie Gerwing, President of the Historical Society. Teena Monteleone/paNOW Staff
A display from the Prince Albert Historical Museum room dedicated to Dr. H.A. Lestock Reid.
A display from the Prince Albert Historical Museum room dedicated to Dr. H.A. Lestock Reid. Teena Monteleone/paNOW Staff
Part of the display in the new Dr. H.A. Lestock Reid room at the museum is this surgical sterilizer unit used at Prince Albert's Holy Family hospital circa 1970.
Part of the display in the new Dr. H.A. Lestock Reid room at the museum is this surgical sterilizer unit used at Prince Albert's Holy Family hospital circa 1970. Teena Monteleone/paNOW Staff

A significant bequest will help add more history to the city of Prince Albert. A $145,000 cheque from the estate of Lenore Andrews, a longtime Prince Albert resident, was formally presented to the Historical Society. 

“I know that Lenore would be thrilled to know that her bequest is going to the Prince Albert Historical Society and will be put to good use,” Rick Wilson, executor of Andrews’ estate said. “She and her husband were both very proud ‘Prince Albertans’ who recognized the importance of and the need to celebrate the city’s history.

Initially, Andrews wanted the house she lived in proclaimed as an historical site. It was located at 157 19th St. W. and was one of the oldest homes in Saskatchewan, dating back to 1878. The original owner was Dr. H.A Lestock Reid who practiced medicine for 56 years as a general practitioner, surgeon, health officer and acting surgeon for the RNW/MP and RCMP. He was also a founding member of the Victoria Hospital.  Dr. C.H. and Lenore Andrews purchased the house in 1947.

“They lived in that home until the 1970s. Ms. Andrews wanted to refurbish it but the cost would have been too much,” Wilson said. “That’s the reason they decided to leave the money to have  Dr. H.A. Lestock Reid remembered in another way.”

The bequest was used to establish a room within the historical museum dedicated to the doctor. In addition, an online virtual museum was created which displays hundreds of digital images of the collection. A section of the historical society website also incudes the biography of Andrews and her husband. In the 1965 federal election, she ran unsuccessfully as the Liberal candidate for Prince Albert. The winning opponent was John G. Diefenbaker.

"The donation will help the museum develop exhibits and our own resources within the museum so we can better service the public,” Michelle Taylor, manager and curator of the Prince Albert Historical Museum, said. 

The $145,000 bequest is the largest contribution in the history of the historical society. Part of the funds will also be used to redesign the front entryway to the museum to make it more accessible. The museum also leveraged the bequest funds to apply for a Canadian Heritage Museum grant. The organization received an additional $25,000 through the program which will be used to improve accessibility of the collection including a new storage system, new computers and software.

The Prince Albert Historical Museum opens to the public on Tuesday, May 23 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, with extended hours on Thursday nights. 

 

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On Twitter: @TeenaMonteleone

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